Pastoral Regions Information

For information on Pastoral Regions in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, click here.

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Announcements
Christmas and Mary, the Mother of God Mass Schedule

Christmas Eve, December 24-Masses at 3 & 5:00 p.m.

Christmas Day, December 25-Mass at 10:00 a.m.

December 31, Mary the Mother of God Vigil Mass at 4:30 p.m.

January 1, Mary the Mother of God, Masses at 9 & 11:00 a.m.

 

 
Immaculate Conception Mass Schedule
Thursday, December 8 is the Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is a Holy Day of obligation. Masses are at 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
The Parish Office is closed.

 
Advent Penance Service
Prepare for the coming of Christ by participating in our Advent Penance Service. Tuesday, December 6, at 7:00 p.m. in the Church. Additional priests will be present for individual confessions. Plan to join us for this special evening of prayer and sacrament.

 
Advent-Waiting for Jesus
Stay awake...be watchful for evidence that Jesus is in our world. Even in the midst of much angst and division, Christians must stay awake to the many signs that He is among us...in our families, in our parish community, in every person we encounter in these special days of Advent-waiting. 
   Will we be filled up with worry about our country, concern about gifts and parties, anxiety about our credit card balance? Or, will there be room in our lives and in our hearts for Jesus to enter in in new and wonderful ways this Christmas? The choice is ours. 

 
Giving Wreaths

Little Flower’s St. Vincent de Paul Society has placed Christmas “Giving Wreaths” at the church doors. Tags suggesting gifts for our clients and children are there for your taking. Gifts should be wrapped, with the tag firmly attached, and returned to church the weekend of December 10 and 11. Food items and gifts for Birthright and Bethany House need not be wrapped. PLEASE DROP OFF ALL ITEMS AT THE SCHOOL OFFICE ENTRANCE.


 
Anointing of the Sick
The anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death. This sacrament is also for anyone who is seriously ill, having a serious medical procedure or anticipating surgery. Along with reception of the Eucharist, anointing may be one of the last sacraments one will receive. A sacrament is an outward sign established by Jesus Christ to confer inward grace. In more basic terms, it is a rite that is performed to convey God’s grace to the recipient, through the power of the Holy Spirit.  Many times the anointing can occur at the conclusion of one of our regularly scheduled masses on weekends or weekdays. Please contact the Parish Office to receive the Anointing of Sick.

 
Bulletin
Mass Times

Weekend: Saturday 4:30 p.m.
 Sunday 9 & 11:00 a.m.

Weekday: Tuesday-Friday 8:30 a.m.

Confessions: Most Saturdays 3-4:00 p.m.

Parish Information

513-541-5560 

5560 Kirby Avenue • Cincinnati, Ohio 45239

ParishOffice@LittleFlower-church.org

Parish Office Hours

Monday-Thursday
8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
(closed 12-1:00 p.m.)
Friday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Map & Directions

Our Vision and Mission

Vision Statement:
St. Therese Little Flower Parish is the sacramental presence of Jesus . . . the mind and heart, the hands and feet, the words and deeds . . . the incarnate and living Body of Christ for our own place and time.

Mission Statement:
We are a community of evangelizing disciples being transformed by the Gospel in order to transform our parish, our neighborhood and our world.

We will do this by cultivating faith formation, participating in spirit-filled worship, fostering stewardship, and reaching out in the name of Jesus to those in need.

Welcome!

Have you been coming to Mass or other activities at Little Flower, but are not actually a member? Are you concerned that “signing up” will require something of you that you are not yet ready for? For some folks, joining a parish can be a big deal. You don’t know if the community is a good fit for you. Or, you don’t know very many of the people, and would feel more comfortable if there were someone to tell you about what kind of community this is and how to fit in. 

   Do any of these realities describe your questions about becoming more invested in Little Flower Parish? If you would like to talk with someone about becoming a member, but don’t want to be pressured if it doesn’t feel right for you, why not contact our Office of Mission and Evangelization and arrange for an informal meeting at your convenience to discuss what you are seeking and what Little Flower might have to offer you. Contact Claire Tenhundfeld at 541-5560 or clairetlf@zoomtown.com.

Year of Mercy

On December 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, Pope Francis officially proclaimed the opening of the “Year of Mercy”. The logo and the motto together provide a fitting summary of what the Jubilee Year is all about. The motto Merciful Like the Father (taken from the Gospel of Luke, 6:36) serves as an invitation to follow the merciful example of the Father who asks us not to judge or condemn but to forgive and to give love and forgiveness without measure (cfr. Lk 6:37-38). 

   The logo – the work of Jesuit Father Marko I. Rupnik – presents a small summa theologiae of the theme of mercy. In fact, it represents an image quite important to the early Church: that of the Son having taken upon his shoulders the lost soul demonstrating that it is the love of Christ that brings to completion the mystery of his incarnation culminating in redemption. The logo has been designed in such a way so as to express the profound way in which the Good Shepherd touches the flesh of humanity and does so with a love with the power to change one’s life. One particular feature worthy of note is that while the Good Shepherd, in his great mercy, takes humanity upon himself, his eyes are merged with those of man. Christ sees with the eyes of Adam, and Adam with the eyes of Christ. Every person discovers in Christ, the new Adam, one’s own humanity and the future that lies ahead, contemplating, in his gaze, the love of the Father.
 
  The scene is captured within the so called mandorla (the shape of an almond), a figure quite important in early and medieval iconography, for it calls to mind the two natures of Christ, divine and human. The three concentric ovals, with colors progressively lighter as we move outward, suggest the movement of Christ who carries humanity out of the night of sin and death. Conversely, the depth of the darker color suggests the impenetrability of the love of the Father who forgives all. 

For more information on the Year of Mercy, click here.


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